Full Episode | Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens, Hour 2 | ANTIQUES ROADSHOW || PBS

Antiques Roadshow PBS
6 May 202453:25

TLDRIn this episode of 'Antiques Roadshow,' the team ventures to Akron, Ohio, to appraise a variety of treasures at Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens. Highlights include a 1920s twin-stone diamond ring estimated at $6,000-$10,000, a Masonic Navajo Indian rug with a retail value of $7,500, and a signed Ed Ruscha screen print valued between $15,000 to $25,000. Additional appraisals feature a 1910 World Series championship Loving Cup Trophy and pin, the latter of which is estimated to sell for $50,000 to $70,000. The show also uncovers a connection to the famous underground comic artist Robert Crumb through signed placemats, and a silver pitcher by Charles Osborne, estimated for auction between $25,000 to $35,000. Each item brings history to life, connecting the guests to their family's past and offering viewers a glimpse into the value and stories behind these antiques.

Takeaways

  • 🏰 Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens, an American country estate in Akron, Ohio, was completed in 1915 and cost the equivalent of over $27 million in 2024 dollars.
  • 💍 A guest's great-grandmother's twin-stone diamond ring from the 1920s was appraised for $6,000 to $10,000 at auction and $20,000 to $30,000 for insurance.
  • 🏺 An heirloom Masonic Navajo Indian rug, passed down through generations of Masons, was valued at $7,500 retail and $10,000 for insurance.
  • 🖼 A family photograph by Margaret Bourke-White, depicting the U.S.S. Akron, was estimated to sell for $4,000 to $6,000 at auction.
  • 🖼️ An Ed Ruscha screen print, 'Two Similar Cities,' was conservatively estimated at $15,000 to $25,000 for auction.
  • 💎 A diamond ring, purchased in the late 1950s or early 1960s as an upgrade to a modest wedding ring, was estimated to be worth at least $40,000.
  • 🎵 Stan Hywet Hall features a 38-by-18-foot tree of life pattern floor covering, which could retail for $75,000 to $85,000 in 2024.
  • 🕰 A Tiffany & Co. silver pitcher designed by Charles Osborne had an auction estimate of $25,000 to $35,000 and an insurance value closer to $55,000 or $60,000.
  • 🧵 A mid-19th-century quilt made from worn dresses and featuring names of community members was insured for $3,500.
  • 🏺 A black marble baluster vase from the Ming dynasty with a history of damage and repair was estimated for insurance purposes at $20,000.
  • ⚔️ A World War I German naval infantry bayonet with a unique engraving was valued at $1,200 to $1,500.

Q & A

  • What is the significance of the name 'Stan Hywet'?

    -Stan Hywet is Old English for 'stone quarry,' named after a natural feature on the original 1,500-acre property of the estate.

  • When was Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens completed?

    -Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens was completed in 1915.

  • What was the construction cost of Stan Hywet Hall in today's currency?

    -The construction cost was around $900,000, which is equivalent to over $27 million in 2024.

  • What is unique about the ring featured in the show?

    -The ring is a twin-stone ring with beautiful strap work and details on the shoulders, likely manufactured in New York during the 1920s.

  • What is the estimated auction value of the featured twin-stone ring?

    -The estimated auction value of the ring is between $6,000 and $10,000.

  • What is the significance of the Masonic Navajo Indian rug?

    -The rug has a Masonic Square and Compasses design and was made in trade for linoleum flooring installed by the owner's great-grandfather, a construction worker and Mason, on the Navajo Indian reservation near Gallup.

  • What is the connection between the values of the Masons and the Navajo people as mentioned in the script?

    -Both the Masons and the Navajo people share values of altruism, family, and community, which are reflected in their respective doctrines and cultural practices.

  • What is the historical context of the photograph by Margaret Bourke-White?

    -The photograph is of the U.S.S. Akron airship, made of duralumin, and was given as a gift to employees of the Goodyear Zeppelin Company, which built the airship for the U.S. Navy.

  • What is the estimated auction value of the Ed Ruscha screen print?

    -The estimated auction value of the Ed Ruscha screen print is between $15,000 and $25,000.

  • What is the story behind the large diamond ring presented to the appraiser?

    -The ring was purchased by a woman in the late 1950s or early 1960s as an upgrade to her small wedding ring from the 1930s. She saved money for years to buy the diamond in New York City and kept it a secret.

  • What is the estimated retail value of the large diamond ring?

    -The estimated retail value of the large diamond ring is at least $40,000.

Outlines

00:00

🏰 Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens: A Historic Gem in Akron, Ohio

The first paragraph introduces the setting of the Antiques Roadshow in Akron, Ohio, at the Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens. Stan Hywet, meaning 'stone quarry' in Old English, is an American country estate built during the Industrial Age and completed in 1915 at a cost equivalent to over $27 million in 2024. The estate features a 64,500-square-foot Tudor Revival-style mansion with 65 rooms, 18 bedrooms, 23 bathrooms, 23 fireplaces, a great hall, a music room, and a tower with views of the gardens. The Seiberling family's home is now a historic house museum and garden, where guests bring their treasures for appraisal.

05:03

💍 A Great-Grandmother's Diamond Ring and Its Journey Through Time

This segment focuses on a guest's great-grandmother's twin-stone diamond ring from the 1920s, which was appraised for its craftsmanship and quality. The ring, originally a smaller diamond, was upgraded by the great-grandmother in the late 1950s or early 1960s, representing her one big lifetime splurge. The appraisal reveals that the ring could fetch between $6,000 and $10,000 at auction, with an insurance value of $20,000 to $30,000, much to the guest's surprise.

10:04

🏺 The Legacy of a Masonic Navajo Indian Rug and Its Storied Past

The guest presents a Masonic Navajo Indian rug that belonged to their great-grandfather. The rug was acquired in the 1930s through a trade involving linoleum flooring the great-grandfather installed in a building on the Navajo reservation near Gallup, New Mexico. The appraisal delves into the Masonic symbolism in the rug's design, including the Square and Compasses, and the G representing God. The rug is valued at $7,500 retail and $10,000 for insurance, reflecting its cultural and family significance.

15:04

🖼️ A Family Heirloom: Margaret Bourke-White's Iconic Photograph of the U.S.S. Akron

The narrative revolves around a family heirloom, an iconic photograph by Margaret Bourke-White of the U.S.S. Akron airship, encased in a duralumin frame. The photograph was a gift to the guest's grandfather, an executive at Goodyear, commemorating the christening of the Akron airship in 1931. The heirloom is appraised for its historical significance, artistic merit, and excellent condition, with an auction estimate of $4,000 to $6,000, and an insurance value of up to $15,000 for a similar print in excellent condition.

20:06

🎭 A Poster of Marilyn Monroe and Its Unexpected Journey

The guest shares the story of a Marilyn Monroe poster that was found rolled up in their home in 1986. The poster, originally a two-dollar pin-up from a 1953 issue of 'Popular Science,' was discovered by the guest's husband during a move in Boston. The segment highlights the serendipity of the poster's discovery and its subsequent journey into the guest's possession.

25:08

🎼 The Seiberlings' Treasured Possessions: An Organ and a Priceless Rug

This part of the script describes the music room at Stan Hywet Hall, which houses a treasured Aeolian organ with 2,433 pipes and 20 chimes, restored in 2008. Additionally, a custom-made tree of life pattern floor covering, purchased in 1915 for $8,208, is mentioned, with its current retail value estimated between $75,000 to $85,000 in 2024.

30:09

🖋️ A Set of Placemats with Robert Crumb's Early Sketches

The guest presents a set of placemats featuring drawings by Robert C. Crumb, created while he was working with the guest's father-in-law at American Greetings. The placemats, which include designs for radios and a sketch of a frog being used as bait for a shark, are recognized for their artistic value and connection to Crumb's early career. The appraiser estimates an auction value of $8,000 to $12,000 for the set, with the potential to increase if kept together.

35:09

⌚️ An Akron Jeweler's Signed Watch and Its Local Significance

The guest shares a family heirloom, a watch signed by Frank Laubach and Clemmer, an Akron jeweler or watchmaker. The watch, with a 14-karat yellow gold case and fob, is a testament to local craftsmanship and has a personal connection to the guest's family history in Akron, Ohio. The appraisal values the watch between $1,000 to $1,500.

40:10

🧵 A Quilt with a Rich Family and Connecticut History

The guest discusses an inherited quilt from 1848, made to commemorate the wedding of their great-great-grandparents. The quilt, featuring the chimney sweep pattern and names of community members, is crafted from English-printed cottons dating from the 1820s to the 1840s. The appraiser highlights the quilt's condition, size, and historical significance, estimating an insurance value of $3,500 for the family heirloom.

45:15

🎨 A Collection of S.L. Jones Carvings and the Passion of Collecting

The guest recounts their 20-year journey of collecting S.L. Jones carvings and drawings, which began with their purchase of the first carving for $500. The collection, which includes a sign from Jones's shop, is valued for its artistic merit and the guest's personal connection to the artist's work. The appraiser provides retail values for the carvings and drawings, with the most valuable piece estimated at $7,500 to $8,000.

50:15

🏺 A Ming-Style Vase with a Fahua Design and Its Appraisal

The guest presents a vase with a fahua design, which was believed to be a carnival glass by the guest's grandmother. The vase features a baluster shape and relief decoration inspired by cloisonné enameling. The appraiser identifies the vase as a 16th-century Ming dynasty ceramic, likely made for a prominent individual, and provides an insurance estimate of $20,000 due to its age and cultural significance.

🗡️ A World War I German Bayonet with a Naval Engraving

The guest shares a World War I German bayonet, which was acquired by their father-in-law from German soldiers during his service in the army. The bayonet, identified as an S98 model, features an engraving indicating it was made for the Kaiserlich Marine, or the German Marine Corps. The appraiser highlights the rarity of the piece and its potential retail value of $1,200 to $1,500.

📰 A Collection of 'Saturday Visiter' Newspapers and Their Historical Impact

The guest discusses a collection of 'Saturday Visiter' newspapers, which were published by Jane Swisshelm, a women's rights activist and abolitionist. The newspapers, dating from the mid-19th century, are valued for their historical content and Swisshelm's contributions to social reform. The appraiser estimates an auction value of $3,000 to $5,000 for the collection.

🏆 A 1910 World Series Championship Trophy and Its Legacy

The guest presents a Loving Cup Trophy and a lapel pin awarded to their great-grandfather, a major league pitcher on the 1910 Philadelphia Athletics World Series championship team. Despite not participating in the World Series, the great-grandfather was a significant part of the team and was awarded the trophy and pin. The appraiser values the trophy at $15,000 to $20,000 and the pin at $50,000 to $70,000, with a total insurance value of $125,000 suggested for the family heirlooms.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Antiques Roadshow

Antiques Roadshow is a television program where appraisers provide estimates of the market value of antiques brought in by the public. In the script, it serves as the central theme where various treasures are evaluated for their worth. The show is a platform for people to learn about the history and value of their possessions, as seen with the various items presented by guests.

💡Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens

Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens is a historic site and museum in Akron, Ohio. It is mentioned in the script as the location for the filming of the Antiques Roadshow episode. The estate represents the grandeur of the American country estate style and is a key setting that provides historical context to the episode.

💡Tudor Revival-style mansion

The Tudor Revival-style mansion refers to a type of architecture inspired by the decorative elements of half-timbered Tudor buildings from medieval England. In the script, it describes the style of Stan Hywet Hall, emphasizing its grandeur and historical significance, which is a key part of the episode's exploration of American history and culture.

💡Appraisal

Appraisal is the process of estimating the value of an item, often an antique or collectible. In the context of the script, appraisal is the core activity, with experts providing insights into the worth of items brought in by guests. It is a significant part of the show's format and the guests' motivations for participating.

💡Historic house museum

A historic house museum is a museum that preserves a historic house or building and often provides a glimpse into the past, showcasing how people lived. In the script, the Seiberling family's home is now a historic house museum, which is a key location for the episode and a source of the treasures being appraised.

💡Masonic Navajo Indian rug

A Masonic Navajo Indian rug is a specific type of rug that combines traditional Navajo weaving techniques with Masonic symbols. In the script, it is an heirloom passed down through generations of a family, reflecting both the cultural heritage of the Navajo people and the fraternal organization of the Masons.

💡

💡Margaret Bourke-White

Margaret Bourke-White was an American photographer and documentary photographer known for her work in industrial photography. In the script, she is mentioned as the photographer of an iconic image of the U.S.S. Akron, which is appraised as part of the show, tying into the episode's focus on historical artifacts and their preservation.

💡Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha is a renowned California artist known for his work in the Pop art movement, particularly for his paintings and prints featuring words and phrases. In the script, an original screen print by Ruscha is appraised, demonstrating the value of contemporary art and the artist's significance within the art world.

💡Diamond ring

A diamond ring is a piece of jewelry that features one or more diamonds set in a ring. In the script, a guest brings in a diamond ring that belonged to her grandmother, which is appraised for its size, quality, and value. The ring's story and appraisal highlight the emotional and financial worth of family heirlooms.

💡Arts and Crafts movement

The Arts and Crafts movement was an international design movement against industrialization that began in the latter half of the 19th century. In the script, a kerosene lamp from the 1920s is described as having an Arts and Crafts aesthetic, which is valued for its craftsmanship and artistic integrity.

💡Quilt

A quilt is a bed covering made from two layers of fabric with a layer of insulating material between them, often sewn together in a decorative design. In the script, a guest presents a quilt from her family's history, which is evaluated for its craftsmanship, age, and historical significance, reflecting the personal and cultural value of such textiles.

Highlights

Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens, an American country estate built during the Industrial Age, is featured in Akron, Ohio.

The construction cost of Stan Hywet Hall in 1915 was equivalent to over $27 million in 2024.

A Tudor Revival-style mansion with 65 rooms and 18 bedrooms is showcased.

An appraiser is amazed by a ring that belonged to a guest's great-grandmother, dating back to the 1870s.

The great-grandmother's ring is valued between $6,000 and $10,000 at auction.

A Masonic Navajo Indian rug with a rich family history is presented.

The Masonic Navajo rug is appraised to be worth around $7,500 in retail.

A vintage photograph of the U.S.S. Akron by Margaret Bourke-White is discovered in excellent condition.

The photograph of the U.S.S. Akron is valued between $4,000 and $6,000 at auction.

An Ed Ruscha screen print titled 'Two Similar Cities' is identified and valued up to $25,000.

A diamond ring upgraded by a guest's grandmother from her original wedding ring is estimated to be worth at least $40,000.

An Arts and Crafts kerosene lamp from the 1920s is found to be in rare original condition, valued between $800 and $1,200.

A silver pitcher with designs by Charles Osborne, acquired by a guest's grandfather, is appraised between $25,000 and $35,000.

A guest shares the story of inheriting a quilt from 1848, made to commemorate a wedding.

The 1848 wedding quilt is valued for insurance at $3,500, reflecting its historical and familial significance.

A collection of S.L. Jones carvings and drawings are revealed, with the best piece valued at $7,500 to $8,000.

A 16th-century Chinese ceramic vase is discovered, with an insurance value of around $20,000.

A World War I German bayonet with a unique naval engraving is appraised between $1,200 and $1,500.

Issues of the 'Saturday Visiter,' a historical newspaper from the 1840s, are valued at $3,000 to $5,000 at auction.

A guest's inherited World Series trophy and pin from the 1910 Philadelphia Athletics are highly valued, with the pin worth $50,000 to $70,000.